Libero

Libero helps parents share their baby’s kicks with BabyBuzz

Areas Used

  • Development
  • Industrialization

Libero helps parents share their baby’s kicks with BabyBuzz

Diaper brand Libero wanted to bring parents even closer together during pregnancies. Their ad agency, Volontaire, came up with the idea of BabyBuzz. The smart bracelet enables mothers to send signals when the baby kicks, causing the other parent’s bracelet to buzz. WSI developed BabyBuzz from drawing to finished product in less than a year.

Libero has been selling diapers for over 50 years. Even though the diapers have changed over time, the company’s goal has always been the same: to give children a diaper that is as comfortable and functional as possible.

Increasing involvement between parents

On the Libero Club forum, one mother raised the subject that many parents felt they were missing: the sense of involvement between the parents during pregnancy. To learn more, Libero conducted a survey among 4,000 parents in the Nordic countries.

“When we got the results of our survey, we contacted our ad agency, Volontaire,” says Camilla Svensson, Marketing Manager at Libero Region North. “They hatched the idea of the BabyBuzz bracelet to help bring parents even closer together during pregnancy. We had never done anything like this before, but we believed in the idea.”

Developing portable technology for parents

In the beginning of 2015, Volontaire turned to WSI and the industrial design company No Picnic for help to further develop the idea. Roman Fedirko of WSI and No Picnic employees developed a prototype of the first BabyBuzz, which was tested by Libero Club members in a pilot project.

“We got a great response from our members in the first test,” says Svensson. “Way beyond expectations. Parents experienced greater closeness, and one couple even described it as ‘a text message from your baby straight to your heart.’”

Following the pilot project with the Libero Club members, WSI developed the finished BabyBuzz bracelet.

“There were several challenges to solve when developing BabyBuzz,” says Roman Fedirko, WSI Project Manager. “The bracelet needed a small, long-life battery since BabyBuzz shouldn’t have to be charged. The mother’s BabyBuzz is connected using Bluetooth to her phone. The signals are then sent to the other parent’s BabyBuzz bracelet, wherever they are.”

From idea to mass production

“BabyBuzz is a brilliant example of how WSI has managed to take an idea to mass production in the shortest possible time,” says Fedirko. During the product development, Fedirko travelled twice to the bracelet’s manufacturer in Malaysia to monitor the production live.

“We never compromise on the quality of the products that we develop,” he says “BabyBuzz also stayed within budget, which is always a challenge when developing smart, portable technology products under time pressure.”